In the midst of a global Pandemic that is devastating to the health of our community and to our economy, the last thing on the minds of private business owners may be the future sale of their company. But while business owners are sheltering safely at home as ordered, they may be wise to consider adopting a longer term view, and evaluating specific steps that would help to position the company for a future, profitable sale.

This post reviews potential hidden value in the business that the majority owner can bring to table to enhance its sale value, but which may not be reflected on its financial statements. This discussion does not present an exhaustive list, and instead, the purpose is to prompt a review of the company’s existing or potential business assets that may require further development after the Pandemic subsides and business activities are permitted to resume.
Continue Reading Unlocking Hidden Business Value: Securing Top Dollar by Giving Full Appreciation to All Available Assets On The Sale of a Private Company

“You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometimes, well, you might find
You get what you need”

You Can’t Always Get What You Want, The Rolling Stones

In addition to Mick Jagger’s legendary performances on stage and vinyl, the song lyrics of The Rolling Stones reflect wisdom that often goes unappreciated. This post focuses on issues that arise when spouses divide their private company ownership interests in the context of family divorce proceedings. When the private company ownership stakes held by the couple are highly valued, there is a potential for a win-win property division and settlement in the best interests of both spouses. You Can’t Always Get What You Want therefore aptly describes the prospects of negotiating a successful Business Divorce in a marital divorce action.
Continue Reading Family Law: Getting What You Need in Divorce—When It Isn’t Possible to Get All That You Want

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“Impostor syndrome is the voice in your head that overlooks, discounts and discredits your accomplishments.”

Jerry Colonna, author of “Reboot: Leadership and the Art of Growing Up”

We have written about the Imposter Syndrome before, but it may have become an even more prevalent concern for business professionals. Just last week, Entrepreneur magazine published a series of interviews with business leaders who have dealt with this challenge in an article titled: “10 Successful Leaders Share Their Struggles with Imposter Syndrome and How to Overcome It” (view the article). Moreover, the Imposter Syndrome is not confined to leaders at the top of the corporate chart as more than half of the employees at Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft, and Google who responded to a survey in 2018 reported that they sometimes feel they don’t deserve their job despite their accomplishments. ¹

Finally, research from the International Journal of Behavioral Science indicates that 70% of people experience imposter syndrome at one point in their lives (view the article). It is time to look again at the Imposter Syndrome, and to consider ways this problem can be dealt with effectively by businesspeople when they experience feelings of inadequacy.


Continue Reading The Imposter Syndrome is Real, But It Can be Overcome